The British Ports Association has outlined its plan for a sustainable growth agenda, and the promotion of the value of UK ports in the supply chain.



The British Ports Association (BPA), represents 86% of UK port freight activities around the UK.

Richard Ballantyne, Chief Executive of the British Ports Association said: “Despite the obvious changes for those operators handling EU freight, 2021 could see a bounce back from the various impacts that affected the UK and global economy last year.”

He added: “Keeping the industry resilient and ports open could mean getting essential workers at ports up the queue just behind health workers, the clinically vulnerable and the elderly, in terms of the roll-out of the Covid-19 vaccine.

On green initiatives,  Ballantyne said that ports were ready to support a move to a more sustainable growth: ”From air quality to their environmental footprint, ports are now looking into what they do to support the government’s long term net zero targets. Indeed, changes to UK energy use and a move towards renewable energy generation is definitely something the sector is aligned to and supporting.

He concludes: “This year we very much look forward to working with all devolved and levels of government to design an agenda that works for both coastal communities and ports.”